Tag Archives: Linda Tooley

12 Days of Christmas Day Seven

Emmanuel Lutheran Church, Baldur, MB

Built 1903, this wood frame Gothic church has extraordinary detail that abets its standard design. The square entry tower, supporting an elaborately decorated bell tower and glorious steeple with lively elaborate spire, has fine tracery over the doorway separating coloured panes. On the eight-sided belfry, every opening is topped with a sunburst design and a pediment. The low balustrade with corner pinnacles accentuates the steeple’s angle. The window details and the slight eave returns on the façade create softness to contrast the sharp edges Gothic usually attempts. Note the contribution the spruce tree makes to attention ascension.

Leave a comment

Filed under Churches, Day Tripping, PRAIRIES

12 Days of Christmas Day Six

Silverton United Church, Silverton, MB

Originally built for Presbyterians in 1892, this little wooden church was moved to its present location in the tiny village of Silverton in 1949. The building is a simple rectangular nave pierced by four stubby lancet windows along each side. The major Gothic feature is the large square entry tower with the battlement along the top – very medieval yet somehow congruent with the open Canadian prairie. It benefits greatly from its setting – a wide-open area backed by trees. As you can see, the building and the lot are well maintained.

3 Comments

Filed under Churches, Day Tripping, Prairie People

12 Days of Christmas Day Five

Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church, Elie, MB

Located on an ancient sacred site, the pale brick of this imposing Catholic Church exudes some form of holy mist that gives the place an intriguing aura.  Built in 1928 in the cross-shaped transept design, Romanesque arches abound even on the entry canopy. The tall square tower with its open belfry and steep roof culminating in an elegant lit crucifix achieves an attractive balance. The circular window over the doorway on the tower is another example of recurring Catholic detail. Brick headers emphasize the doorway and the windows. Medium-pitched parapets extend above the gable ends of the transepts with Palladian windows, a Catholic preference, beneath.

Leave a comment

Filed under Churches, Day Tripping, PRAIRIES

12 Days of Christmas Day Four

St. Francois Xavier Roman Catholic Church, St. Francois Xavier, MB

Built in 1900, this small but imposing tan brick church set on a fieldstone foundation was designed by Joseph Senecal, leading architect of Roman Catholic churches in Manitoba. St Francois Xavier was originally called Grantown, a settlement created by Metis leader Cuthbert Grant. This building replaced a substantial log church, which had served the parishioners since 1833 on the same site. Cuthbert Grant is buried in the cemetery that surrounds the church. Though somewhat obscured by a gorgeous evergreen, the front elevation is a work of symmetrical accomplishment. The corner towers with their roofs and pinnacles balance the central entrance, the side entrances and the well-proportioned square tower with its delightful cornice and dentil. Arcades surround the belfry, which is topped with a steep four-sided roof with small round openings.

2 Comments

Filed under Churches, Day Tripping, PRAIRIES

12 Days of Christmas Day Three

Douglas United Church, Douglas, MB

This modest and well-maintained wooden Gothic church was built in 1893 for a Methodist congregation. Sometime over its 118-year history, the church lost its belfry and steeple though the roof pitches and lancet windows still point heavenward. Notice the dainty corner pillars with plain pinnacles. The rear section was added on in 1957.

Leave a comment

Filed under Churches, Day Tripping, PRAIRIES

12 Days of Christmas Day Two

St. Josaphat’s Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, Shoal Lake, MB

Illustrating my hometown bias, here’s a second church in Shoal Lake. Located across the street from yesterday’s church, this white wooden Catholic Church has three modest onion domes dominating the façade. The domes and their drums are octagonal with heavy iron cross finials. The three arched windows on the front elevation compliment the domes. The entry pavilion to the rectangular nave is bracketed by the slim corner towers. This church was built in 1945 to replace the 1892 building they had bought from the Anglicans in 1919 for $1,000. The old church became the IOOF Hall and was moved to Fourth and South Railway where it still stands.

1 Comment

Filed under Churches, Day Tripping, PRAIRIES

12 Days of Christmas Day One

In 2005 Linda and I began sending out Christmas greetings in the form of an email a day for the 12 Days of Christmas with a new theme each year. We sent churches, schools and houses. Instead of emails, this year I am continuing the tradition with a daily post of a beautiful church in rural Manitoba on this blog. Share them with your family and friends. Enjoy! 

St. Helen’s Roman Catholic Church, Shoal Lake, MB

 The sun rises on one of five churches in Shoal Lake. Built in 1940, this small wooden Gothic church preserves the holiness of St. Helen, here bathed in early morning Manitoba sunshine. It was built as a part of the mission of the Parish of Elphinstone. The nave is a typical rectangle with a low-pitched front porch added later. The tower supports a belfry and an octagonal steeple topped with a heavy cross. The louvered arched openings on the tower have a sunburst pattern complimented by the rose window beneath. The lancet windows along the side are edged with coloured panes.

Leave a comment

Filed under Churches, Day Tripping, PRAIRIES

Finding My Audience – ReadReidRead.com First Anniversary

Reid Dickie

It’s hard to believe a year has passed since I started this blog. A year ago I had several intentions for ReadReidRead: as an ongoing celebration of beautiful Linda, as an outlet to share my enthusiasm for local heritage in its many forms; as a canvas for my personal cultural interests, as a platform for my spiritual experiences, as an inspiration for others and as a way of finding my audience. Today I can humbly and gratefully say I have fulfilled those intents to a degree I never anticipated.

Linda’s presence on the blog is always very strong and loving.  There are numerous pictures of her scattered throughout my posts. Search in the Linda Category for my many tributes over the past year. In the Gallery you will find some adorable pictures of Linda from her childhood.

I’ve written extensively about local heritage over the past ten years and enjoy using the blog to share my pictures and thoughts on heritage buildings and events. I have a personal collection of over 1000 pictures of heritage sites that I will be drawing from for future posts. Creating videos has added a whole new dimension to my heritage reporting. Check out Churches, Houses and MB Heritage pages for dozens of heritage examples.

Culturally, everyone from Salvador Dali to Ralph Eugene Meatyard (maybe not that big a step), Bjork to Wm Burroughs (ditto), Fellini to DickTool Co have been homaged on my blog this year. Personal experiences like hearing Eleanor Rigby for the first time in 1966 and seeing Lennon and the Plastic Ono Band in Toronto in 1969 to more recent encounters with various art forms have been vented on the blog. For a chronology, examples and links to the art Linda and I made when we first united, check out the DTC Art page.   

Practicing shamanism and incorporating its wisdom into my life has guided me to share my experiences via the blog, not with an agenda to convert you or change your mind about anything (I have nothing to sell) but to simply tell my story, share my glimpses into the hidden places, into other possibilities and report what happens. There are dozens of posts and pages relating directly to my shamanic experiences on the blog. Numerous Categories apply. Check out About, Sacred Places and FAQ pages for detailed reports.

Because of the blog, many readers have contacted me this year, most often about heritage related matters. I have connected people with places and with each other, found knowledgable people to answer obscure questions and given specific directions to heritage and spiritual sites on the prairies. Inspiring people to seek Spirit on the Canadian plains has created enormous opportunities for personal gratitude. One of the most satisfying and humbling experiences in my blogging life was when my friend Chris Scholl said I inspired him to create his thoughtful, thought-provoking personal blog, Love Art and Fear. I inspired myself to create another blog devoted entirely to the history of my hometown, Shoal Lake, MB. The DickToolCo channel on YouTube and two hundred pictures on Flickr are more outlets for creative fun!

I have attracted a blog audience that far surpasses my wildest expectations when I started typing away at this a year ago. Almost 88,000 hits in the year equates to about 240 hits a day. I seem to have found an audience and I thank you, every one of you who has landed at readreidread.com for whatever reason, I thank you; everyone who subscribes to my scribblings and guff, I thank you; all the befuddled and wild-eyed who suddenly find themselves in Reidland, I thank you (be brave); everyone who finds out shamanism isn’t what they think it is by reading my blog, I thank you.

Besides simply giving me something to do almost every day, my blog has provided an outlet for my diverse interests, improved and expanded my computer skills and offered satisfactions I never dreamed possible.

What’s in the future for ReadReidRead? Carrying on the festive tradition that Linda and I began six years ago, I’ll be posting a daily feature to celebrate the 12 Days of Christmas. This year I have selected 12 Manitoba churches, which begin Wednesday, December 14. My year-end review is in the works and will be posted December 31. All the original intents of the blog still apply and I can assure you my diversity and curiosity will continue to be fully represented. Is blogging still fun? It’s a blast! Even after 565 posts!

Thank you for visiting my blog this year. Be happy. Reid

2 Comments

Filed under BEAUTY, Blog Life, Linda, Local History, Music, Prairie People, shamanism, Soul Building

Cat’s Eyes

Reid Dickie

The cat you see above is my buddy, Tulu. Linda and I found Tulu at an animal shelter about 18 months before Linda died. Tulu won the lottery then lost half of it, so to speak. She’s a beautiful little cat. If you look closely you can see Linda reflected in her eyes when she took the picture.

Leave a comment

Filed under BEAUTY, Critters, Family, Life and Life Only, Linda, Love

Be Happy is contagious!

Reid Dickie

This is my friend, Chris Scholl. He is happy in this picture. This is a link to his blog post today. It’s called “Happy.”

Leave a comment

Filed under Ancient Wisdom, Family, Linda, Love, Spirit

Death and Taxes

Reid Dickie

The old saw goes, “The only things you can count on in life are death and taxes.” At some point these two parallel inevitabilites must intersect.

Apparently we aren’t truly dead, bureaucratically dead, until we experience tax death. This week Canada Revenue Agency sent me a letter saying that Linda is now tax dead (my terminology). That means that every level of government is satisfied that she owes them no further taxes. Hey Baby, off the hook! You win!

This got me thinking about all the different ways we can be and need to be dead in this culture. Physically, when the body stops and certain disposal processes start, you end up six feet under in a tight one-room apartment with no doorbell, or your anonymous ashes dust away somewhere appropriate or inappropriate, depending on how clear you were about this with your family. That seems easy and familiar. Being the 21st century, there are numerous new ways you can dispose of your precious remains ranging from being shot into space to being liquified and flushed to being buried inside a large dead animal instead of a coffin. Seriously!

Mentally, if you are very lucky, some of your ideas and/or creations linger on after you die. This can happen through children, media exposure, art, notoriety, genius, setting an example and so on. Soul persists past physical and mental death yet it is the one aspect of ourselves we are most uncomfortable with and least educated about.

An oft-used crossword puzzle clue is Last words? with the answer obit. Your obituary proclaims and asserts your death by recounting Part One of your story, or, most likely, your story as interpreted by family members or friends under duress, each of whom would write a very different obituary depending on how close they were to you. Sometimes agencies or companies you deal with after a death will request a copy of the obituary.

Here’s a great idea! Write your own obituary! I did. Tell your own story. It saves time and confusion and illustrates your understanding of what your loved ones are going through after your death. It’s an expression of love. For more information on writing your own obituary, read my post called Obituary Euphemisms.

Part Two of your story is your last will and testament or what happens to your worldly stuff now that you are dead. This is an important part of your story because it directly states your wishes and enables an orderly and fair dispersion of your estate. Keep it simple and honest.  Some people see their will as one last opportunity to be small and extract revenge. Try not to be that person. Be large and grateful instead. If you are over 18 years old, you should have a will. Like writing your own obituary, creating a will is your opportunity to have your life story end exactly the way you want. As luck would have it, I have written about wills.

What other parts of your story remain to be told? Bureaucratic death must be satisfied. Almost immediately after a death, the province issues a thwack of death certificates because every company and level of government you deal with is going to ask for one. You are now dead to the province. Insurance death was, in Linda’s case, quick and efficient, though often it is not. Her estate was not complicated and she had a clear and concise will. Linda’s tax death, other than, what my Mom would call, a schmozzle with H & R Block (an eye-roller for a later post), was smooth and sympathetically administered by Canada Revenue Agency. This means that Linda is, officially and in every other way, as dead as she possibly can be.

In a shaman’s world, in my world, Linda lives on, in my heart, as a spirit, as a helper, infinitely. She guides me every day; we communicate in a pure and direct manner using shamanic techniques and a special agate. We exchange a love that transcends death by accepting what death is – natural, neutral, necessary. Linda is never far away.

To a shaman who accesses non-ordinary reality, the old saw now goes: The only things in life you can count on are no death and no taxes.

2 Comments

Filed under BEAUTY, Family, grief, Life and Life Only, Linda, Love, Old Souls, Spirit

DickToolCo YouTube Channel First Anniversary

Reid Dickie

It was one year ago today I began my foray into finding an audience on the internet but it didn’t start with this blog. It started with the DickToolCo YouTube channel which uploaded its first video on November 8, 2010. The reason for the date was to coincide with the Celebration of Light and Linda, an evening of interesting entertainment I created for about 120 of our close friends, which occurred on November 9.

Thanks to the energy and efforts of friend and filmmaker Kevin Uddenberg, three of the videos Linda and I created in the late 1970s were available on YouTube that evening which I announced from the stage of the Park Theatre at the Celebration. The first video on the channel was Be An Artist Now, the long form, 29 seconds.

 Since then my learning curve has been steep and a ton of fun. I now create and upload my own videos to YouTube. The HD video camera I bought this summer has opened up vast new possibilities for YouTube content. A major part of my winter activities plan is to delve into the hours of stuff that I shot this summer.

YouTube led to Flickr because I needed to show the world the terrific still pictures Kevin took of the Celebration and all our beautiful friends who were there. You can see them on the DickToolCo channel on Flickr. I have video of the event which I cherish and will someday edit. So, with original content on YouTube and Flickr, what my friend Terry calls, “Reid’s little empire” had begun.

In the past year the DickToolCo YouTube channel has attracted over 13,000 views, an astonishing and humbling number. I have augmented the videos Linda and I created with video reports from my various travels this year. Currently there are 118 videos on the channel, 41 that Linda and I made together, the rest are my more recent creations. Thank you for watching stuff on the DickToolCo channel! Keep checking back for new uploads. Be happy, Reid

The Top Ten Most Viewed Videos on DickToolCo Channel

1. Giant Manitoba Sinkhole June 16/11

2. Lake Manitoba Flood at The Narrows

3. Souris Peacocks

4. Kangaroo Birth Cycle Coat

5. Post Nuclear PSA #1

6. Video List #2 Things You Should Never Ask a Smoke Detector

7. Go – Pere Ubu

8. Caligari’s Mirror – Pere Ubu

9. I Scare Myself

10. Souris Swinging Bridge Before and After

Leave a comment

Filed under Art Actions, Blog Life, Linda, Love

I Scare Myself

My one concession to Hallowe’en

Leave a comment

Filed under Art Actions, DickToolery, Humour, video art

Go Somewhere Else for Free

Reid Dickie

In the late 1970s, when Linda and I began our life together, we created dozens of collages on paper using cut-out techniques, reproducing them by photo copier and stapling them to lamp posts, billboards, hoardings and so on. I have uploaded several dozen of our collages with newly written captions onto DickToolCo Flickr. The captions are an outlet for my often-dark sense of humour.

To potentially encourage you to visit my Flickr site – a world somewhere else, free and the antidote to your usual clutter – I offer two of the collages with their captions for your possible amusement.

Caffeine Patch 

No time for coffee? Need the caffeine anyway? Try the new Caffeine Patch from Maulco. Slap one on first thing every morning and you are caffeinated for the day. Convenient, non-allergenic, contains no peanuts. Side effects include jitters, shitters and quitters. Extreme but rare side effects include serial killing, machete-wielding, panic attacks and/or death. 

Destiny 

Umber Aja swims next to his dolphin brother, Climie, through the Gulf of Boredom as they try for the world title in tandem flexing at 8:30 every time it comes around which for the boys is just about often enough as they catch their combined breaths gulping the sewage-spoiled water. Climie almost swallowed an eyeball about an hour ago but spit it out at the last second.

Amused? See more DickToolCo collages here.

Leave a comment

Filed under Art Actions, DickToolery, Linda, Winnipeg

Pictures of an Amazing Year

Reid Dickie

This is a sample of my first batch of 2011 travel pictures. Taken in the Big Muddy in southern Saskatchewan, an enduring symbol of hard pioneer life still stands atop a rise surrounded by crop.

I have uploaded the first 56 pictures from my various travels over the spring and summer onto the DickToolCo page on Flickr. They include shots of Vancouver in the spring, a series of cityscapes of downtown Winnipeg taken from the rooftop of the Fort Garry Hotel in mid-May, flood pictures of Brandon, Melita and the flood protest rally held at the Manitoba Legislature in June. During Doors Open I took a series of pictures of the Ukrainian Labour Temple in north Winnipeg. I always snapped pictures during my many trips to Souris covering the flood. Plus several shots from my July travels in Saskatchewan. Some of the pictures are along the right hand sidebar on my blog. All my pictures are here. Enjoy!

Leave a comment

Filed under Art Actions, Blog Life, Day Tripping, Flood, Heritage Buildings, Linda, Manitoba Heritage, Pioneers, Roadside Attractions, Sacred Places, Saskatchewan, Winnipeg

Linda and Teedy

1 Comment

Filed under BEAUTY, Family, Linda

Time For “Just This” Again

This is my 500th post since December 11, 2010 and I can’t think of anything more appropriate than reposting Ken Wilber’s defining and remarkable Just This

In the heart of Emptiness there is a mysterious impulse, mysterious because there is actually nothing in the heart of Emptiness (for there is nothing in Emptiness, period). Yet there it is, this mysterious impulse, the impulse to…create. To sing, to shine, to radiate; to send forth, reach out and celebrate; to sing and shout and walk about; to effervesce and bubble over, this mysterious exuberance in the heart of Emptiness.

Emptiness empties itself of emptiness, and thus becomes Full, pregnant with all worlds, a fruition of the infinite impulse to play, hidden in the heart of your own deepest Self. If you rest in the Witness, settle back as I-I, and look very carefully for the Looker – if you turn within right now and try to see the Seer – you won’t see anything at all, for you cannot see the Seer. All you will find is a vast Freedom and Emptiness, in which the entire Kosmos is now arising. Out of the pure Emptiness that is your deepest suchness, all worlds arise. Your own impulse of looking has brought forth the universe, and here it resides in the vastness of all space which is to say, in the purity of your own primordial awareness. This has been obvious all along; this you have known all along. Just this, and nothing more, just this.

from One Taste

—<>:<>:<>:<>:<>:<>:<>:<>:<>—

Watch Ken explain, “Love is not just a feeling between people. It’s actually a force operating throughout the entire universe. It’s been recognized by philosophers, east or west, alive and from time immemorial.” He seems to be getting used to his new teeth. Please watch this.

Leave a comment

Filed under Ancient Wisdom, ken wilber, Old Souls, shaman

Another Westbound Fast Freight

Reid Dickie

Hightailing it westward out of Winnipeg with a full load, heavy steel on steel, this CNR fast freight howls, roars and churns toward the vanishing point.

Leave a comment

Filed under Trains

Spirit Sands Today

Reid Dickie

Though I hadn’t planned on a day trip today, the morning broke so lovely and promising my wanderlust kicked in. Warm and sunny, the drive out Hwy #2 was pleasant and fast. One other car waited in the parking lot at Spirit Sands trailhead. It was a perfect day for a hike.

We’ve had a bit of rain in last day or so and the sand was a little wet but drying quickly in the sunshine. Along the trail I saw this poplar leaf bejewelled with dew gems. (Click on any pic for HD view)

From the observation deck this year, you can see an interesting phenomenon. Due to the prevailing northwesterlies, the dunes at Spirit Sands are always moving, literally. The sand blows up and over the edge, down the duneface, building the dune forward. On the right side of this picture you can see a clean new dune that is active and quickly moving unlike the other dunes which have some vegetation and are thus more stable and slower moving. I seldom see such a clear example of a fully active dune.

With most of the leaves gone from the deciduous trees, the evergreens are in their glory. Also more evident are the rampikes and deadfall. Today the rampikes, leaning away from the wind, stood out against the deep blue autumn sky.

I have been told that the length of a tree’s life is also the length of its death, meaning the number of years a tree grew is how many years it will take to turn into earth. That beautiful, balanced definition of the pace of Nature is as good as any I’ve found.

The hike to the dunes through the mixed forest offers numerous opportunities to see the aftermath of windstorms, spruce bud worm and the parasitic dwarf mistletoe, all have had their way with the trees in the park at one time or another. This tree trunk lay split, gaping and dying well along the trail, its meat and bones humbled by time and the elements.

Out on the dunes, where seven-eights of the world is sky, the wind drew its crazy calligraphy in the sand using plants as brushes. Can you decipher the wild wind’s subtle message?

As I arrived at the information kiosk returning from my hike, a swarm of bright red ladybugs danced in a sunny spot, several of them landing on me. There is a soul connection between Linda and ladybugs and I always know she is nearby when her bugs turn up. We walked this trail so often together, I frequently turn and think Linda is walking right along with me. She was today, every step of the way.

By the time I came off the trail, about two and a half hours later, the day was over 20 degrees C with light winds and a fine cloudscape to entertain me on the way home.

Leave a comment

Filed under Ancient Wisdom, BEAUTY, Earth Phenomena, Linda, Natural Places, Sacred Places, shaman, spirit sands

Sand Part 1

Reid Dickie

“Stones are primordial matter. Sand is matter ground by the infinity of time. It makes one mindful of eternity. Sand is matter which has been transformed and has almost become liquid and spiritual.” – Anonymous

Great Sand Hills, western Saskatchewan

What is sand? Though many dictionaries define sand as consisting of rock and mineral matter only, they omit most of its intriguing aspects, such as the shells, fossils, corals, algae and related material like gemstones, volcanic material and fossilized plants and animals often found within a single small sample.
Sand: Slang Courage; stamina; perseverance: “She had more sand in her than any girl I ever seen; in my opinion she was just full of sand.” (Mark Twain)  

TALKING ABOUT SAND 

Dr. Dave Douglas, Pasadena Community  College, CA

Sand, along with gravel, silt and clay are collectively known as sediment, and are produced by the mechanical and chemical breakdown of rocks. Once disaggregated from the original source rock, this material is then eroded and transported by either wind, water or ice, often ending up at the deposits of rivers or lakes, as sand dunes, or ultimately as sediment in the sea. Eventually this material may be buried to sufficient depth within the earth to harden and form sedimentary rock.

Navajo sand painting

The composition of sand is largely dependent on the source material. For example, the sand around volcanic islands is often composed of volcanic rock fragments, volcanic glass, and other minerals associated with volcanic rocks. In contrast, sediment found on the beaches of southern California are largely composed of quartz(the most durable common mineral), possibly some feldspar (also durable, but more easily chemically weathered to clay), and other minerals associated with the plutonic igneous rocks which form the bulk of the mountain ranges nearby.

In areas where there is no good source of sedimentary material from mountains or volcanoes, sand is often entirely composed of organic material i.e. shell fragments, coral, and the tests (skeletons) of small planktonic organisms.

The texture of sediment is largely determined by the transportation process. The three important parameters used to assess the texture of sediment are size, rounding and sorting.

Grain Size – The terms gravel, sand, silt and clay carry with them a size connotation.

Gravel is any material greater than 2 millimeters in its largest dimensions. This includes boulders, cobbles, pebbles and granules (in decreasing size order).

Sand is any material between 2 mm and 0.06 mm in size.

We usually sub-divide this category into very coarse, coarse, medium, fine etc. In practical terms, very fine sand is about the smallest grain size you can still see with the naked eye.

Silt is material which is finer than sand, but still feels gritty when rubbed on your teeth.

Tibetan sand painting

Clay is the finest material of all, and pure clay will feel smooth on your teeth, and will form a sticky ball when wet. As a general rule, material gets smaller the more it has been transported. Therefore, very coarse material usually indicates a short distance of transport and vice versa.

Rounding – As material is transported, it is subject to abrasion and impact with other particles which tends to “round off” the sharp edges or corners. Therefore a well-rounded sand grain has probably traveled a great distance from its original source area, while an angular grain has probably only been transported locally. Be careful not to confuse rounding with sphericity. A well-rounded grain may or may not resemble a sphere. Rounding is also related to the size of the grains, i.e. boulders tend to round much more quickly than sand grains because they strike each other with much greater force.

Sorting – The sorting of a sediment is simply how well the sedimentary material is separated out by size. For example, if all the grains in a sediment sample are very nearly the same size, then we say the sample is “well sorted.” If a sediment sample were to contain pieces of gravel, as well as sand and silt, it would be a “poorly sorted” sample.  Sorting is somewhat dependent on the distance of transport, but it is primarily affected by the medium of transport.  Water is an excellent medium for sorting of particles by size (and density). Wind is probably the best sorting mechanism of all, but only on the finer grain sized (not much gravel is moved by wind transport).  Ice is the poorest sorting mechanism, transporting and depositing all sizes of sediment with equal ease.

By carefully examining the composition, size, rounding and sorting of sand, along with other clues such as the surface texture of the grains and the kind of organic material present, we can make an interpretation as to depositional environment of the sand, how far it has traveled, and its ultimate source area.                                              

Navajo sand paintings

Leave a comment

Filed under Ancient Wisdom, Sacred Places, spirit sands