Tag Archives: gardenton

Three New Church Videos

Reid Dickie

It’s buzz buzz buzz all the doo-dah day here with three more short videos squirted out and now uploaded to YouTube. I always take lots of pictures at heritage sites, especially churches because they are particularly photogenic – must be their aura. Since I can only use a few pictures in my blog posts, I’ve made short videos using pictures from three Manitoba churches. You get to see contextual views of how and where the building sits, shots of it from many different angles and some sound to accompany the vision. I have featured all three churches in blog posts. Click on the church name to read my blog post. Click picture to watch the video.

St. Michael’s Ukrainian Orthodox Church, near Gardenton,  2:39

Union Point United Church, Hwy #75, near Ste. Agathe 2:07

First and Second St. Elias Ukrainian Orthodox Churches, Sirko 3:09

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Filed under Churches, Heritage Buildings, Manitoba Heritage

Two Bridges Over the Roseau

Reid Dickie

One of my heritage projects this summer is to photograph and film as many interesting bridges as I can find. The two train bridges a few posts back were the start of the series. The next episode in “Spanning Something in Manitoba” offers two bridges over the same river, the Roseau River in southern Manitoba.

The Roseau River is a relatively short (344 km) river whose headwaters are in northern Minnesota and which drains into the Red River west of Dominion City, thus part of the Hudson Bay watershed. The Roseau can carry a lot of water some springs and often floods the surrounding area which includes numerous First Nations. By mid-August 2012 it is a sluggish shallow pond lumbering toward its destiny.

At Gardenton, MB this wooden truss bridge spans the Roseau River. Built in 1918 using a model called the Howe truss, the relatively rare Howe truss, patented in 1840 by Massachusetts millwright William Howe, includes vertical members and diagonals that slope up towards the center. The diagonal web members are in compression and the vertical web members are in tension. Since the Howe truss can support heavy loads over long distances, it was hugely popular for railroad bridges. The Gardenton bridge replaced irregular ferry service and introduced a new and efficient method to move people and goods. The bridge has been designated a municipal heritage site.

A few miles downstream from the truss bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Roseau. Located northwest of the village of Roseau River in the Senkiw area, this swinging bridge was built in 1946 to allow school children to get to Senkiw school across the river. It was badly damaged in the 1950 flood and fell into disrepair after the school closed in 1967. Restored in 2000, it has been deemed a municipal heritage site.

About 140 feet long by my paces, the bridge has just enough sway and swing to make it interesting. The infrastructure that acts as footing and supports for the cables is an example of country thrift and ingenuity. The large round metal rollers with the spikes around which the cables are wound and held are threshing machine cylinders which pounded the stooks releasing the grain. In their new life secured upright against the prairie sky and wrapped in steel cables, the cylinders become sculptural symbols evoking ancient and future regimes of rust.

Suspension bridges are relatively rare in Manitoba. The swinging bridge in Souris, MB is the best known one although today, it is non-existent until a new one is built for the summer 2013.

Click now to watch my 3.75 minute video on these bridges.

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Filed under Bridges, Day Tripping, Manitoba Heritage, Natural Places

St. Michael’s Ukrainian Greek Orthodox Church, near Gardenton, MB

Reid Dickie

A plaque at St. Michael’s succinctly tells its story:

Constructed in 1899, this church is a fine early example of Ukrainian ecclesiastical architecture in Canada. Its distinctive massing, plan and bulbous cupolas reflect the Byzantine-influenced architectural heritage of the homeland of the settlers in the region. The traditional free-standing bell tower was built in 1906 and, like the church, is distinguished by the high quality of its wooden craftsmanship. Built by the first generation of Ukrainians to arrive in Canada, St. Michael’s served as an affirmation of their cultural identity and remains today as Canada’s oldest existing Ukrainian church.

The first permanent Ukrainian Orthodox church erected in Canada sits quietly next to PR 209 about 3 kms west of Gardenton in southern Manitoba. Since its consecration on October 14, 1899, the little church has served the local Ukrainian community. In 1922 the parish joined the Greek Orthodox Church of Canada; previously it has been served by a Russian Orthodox mission.

Constructed by immigrants who came to the Gardenton area after 1896 from northern Bukovyna, now western Ukraine, St. Michael’s is a fine example of Bukovynian pioneer architecture inside and out. Measuring 22 feet by 48 feet, the church walls were constructed of horizontal logs, lumbered during the winter of 1898-1899. Wooden shingles covered the low pitched roof which became badly warped from exposure to heavy winter snows and was completely replaced in 1915 with a central dome 33 feet high from floor to ceiling and small cupolas at either end. A hundred feet from the church stands the square frame belltower.

The graves of many early Ukrainian pioneers crowd around the back of the church; the earliest grave is from 1898. The distinctive white Orthodox crosses were made in cement moulds.

According to John Panchuk, attorney and Ukrainian community leader from the Gardenton area, “Inside the historic church one may see unique religious artifacts, such as wooden crosses, candelabras and altar decorations built by local craftsmen and a collection of rare lithographs from Kiev, Odessa, St. Petersburg and Moscow.”

Watch my 2:39 video of St. Michael’s.

Make it a day trip! Other nearby sites of interest include Holy Eucharist Ukrainian Catholic Church located in Rosa on Hwy #59, Holy Trinity Ukrainian Catholic Church east of Stuartburn on PR 201 and a hike through one of the tall grass prairie reserves just east of Tolstoi on PR 209. Watch for poison ivy. Be sure to check your body for wood ticks. Ticks are having a banner year!

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Filed under Churches, Day Tripping, Heritage Buildings, Manitoba Heritage, Pioneers