Manitoba Heritage Building – Municipal Building, Reston

Reid Dickie

The municipal building for the RM of Pipestone is a beauty! Located on a prominent corner in Reston, MB, it is a rare example of Italianate style used on a public building. The style, popular at the turn of the 20th century, was employed mainly on houses, rarely for civic structures. Built in 1917, Brandon architect William Alexander Elliott designed this elegant, compact two-storey place, which features many  Italianate elements including  low-pitched rooflines, wide eaves, tall windows and the small corner tower. The main entrance on the building’s south side has a rounded brick arch with stone highlights. The secondary entrance is simpler with a shed roof. The windows are a variety of shapes and sizes with the slim arched window on the west side complementing the main entrance beautifully. There is playful contrast between the striking red tapestry brick and the light coloured second floor and tower and white trim.

One of southwestern Manitoba’s most prolific architects, W. A. Elliot’s buildings include Park School, Brandon 1904 (demolished), Hamilton Hotel, Neepawa 1904 (burned), Bank of Montreal, Brandon 1905, Clark Hall, Brandon University 1906, Empire Bottling Company bottling house/warehouse, Brandon 1906, Brandon Collegiate Institute 1907, Methodist Church, now Dutch Christian Reform, Brandon 1909, Carberry Town Hall 1909, Cecil Hotel, Brandon 1910 (burned 1981), Central Fire Station, Brandon 1911, Opera House, Virden 1911, St Matthew’s Anglican Cathedral, Brandon 1912, Methodist Church, now St Paul’s United, Souris 1908. Elliot also created design plans for over 40 public schools built before WWI in Manitoba towns like Baldur, Newdale, Elkhorn, Melita, Brookdale, Rivers, Oak River, Rapid City and Reston. He also designed buildings for numerous Saskatchewan towns and cities including Moose Jaw and Arcola. Now Buddy’s Pub, this was Arcola, SK’s town hall designed by Elliot and built in 1905.

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Filed under Day Tripping, Heritage Buildings, Local History, Manitoba Heritage

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